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dc.contributor.advisorAntoine Allanore.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRinzler, Charles Cooperen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-15T14:21:25Z
dc.date.available2017-09-15T14:21:25Z
dc.date.copyright2017en_US
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/111253
dc.descriptionThesis: Ph. D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 2017.en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student-submitted PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe electronic and thermodynamic properties of noncrystalline systems are investigated and quantitatively connected through the application of theory presented herein. The electronic entropy is confirmed to control the thermodynamics of molten semiconductors. The presented theory is applied to predict the thermodynamic properties of the prototypical Te-Tl molten semiconductor from empirical electronic property data and the electronic properties from empirical thermodynamic data. The theory is able to answer a question posed in the literature regarding a correlation between features of phase diagrams and molten semiconductivity. The quantitative connection is extended to predict thermodynamic properties of fusion, and a stability criterion to predict whether a system will behave as a molten semiconductor is developed and verified. The investigation and prediction of electronic transitions, such as metallization of high temperature systems, is enabled by the theory provided herein. The thermodynamic bases for key features of phase diagrams in the molten state are explained and quantified. Methods to rapidly collect electronic and entropy data in the molten phase are provided and enable access to key thermodynamic data for high temperature systems. The connection of electronic entropy to short-range order allows the detection and prediction of solid-phase compounds through the collection of electronic property data in the molten phase and the prediction of thermodynamic quantities of fusion. An absolute reference for entropy at temperatures substantially above 0! K is proposed.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Charles Cooper Rinzler.en_US
dc.format.extent166 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMaterials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.titleQuantitatively connecting the thermodynamic and electronic properties of molten systemsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc1003290747en_US


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