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dc.contributor.advisorHeather Hendershot.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCowls, Josh (Joshua Nicholas)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Comparative Media Studies.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-15T15:28:13Z
dc.date.available2017-09-15T15:28:13Z
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/111303
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M. in Comparative Media Studies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Humanities, 2017.en_US
dc.description"June 2017." Cataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 106-111).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe improbable election of Donald Trump relied on myriad factors. Among the most important of these, I argue here, was Trump's deft use of the social media site Twitter, which Trump used as a means to both communicate with his supporters directly, and to reach a far wider audience in the mainstream media. In adopting this hybrid communications strategy, Trump's political communications reached a wider audience, on a sturdier basis, than earlier figures who had similarly adopted what I dub a "paranoid populist" philosophy. I present case studies of two of these historical figures, Charles Coughlin, whose radio "sermons" reached millions in the 1930s, and Pat Robertson, whose cable television network inspired a devout following from afar. The grander political ambitions of both Coughlin and Robertson were stymied by a combination of technological, legal and economic factors, which did not serve to constrain Trump's candidacy in the same way. Instead, Trump's hybrid use of Twitter blended the breadth of Coughlin's audience with the depth of Robertson's following, providing him both an unfiltered line of communication to his supporters and a means of reaching a far wider audience through the provocative nature of his pronouncements. Through a combination of theoretical and empirical analysis, I illustrate the extent of Trump's paranoid populism on Twitter, and explain how Trump secured an avalanche of mainstream media coverage through the eternally controversial nature of his candidacy. I conclude with some reflections on Trump's early presidency, and his evolving use of Twitter as a platform for decrying the very news organizations without whose coverage his election would have proved impossible.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Josh Cowls.en_US
dc.format.extent111 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectHumanities.en_US
dc.subjectComparative Media Studies.en_US
dc.titleFrom Trump Tower to the White House, in 140 characters : the hyper-mediated election of a paranoid populist presidenten_US
dc.title.alternativeHyper-mediated election of a paranoid populist presidenten_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M. in Comparative Media Studiesen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Humanities.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Comparative Media Studies.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMIT Comparative Media Studies/Writing
dc.identifier.oclc1003284455en_US


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