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dc.contributor.advisorAmy Glasmeier.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKenney, Erin (Erin Brown)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Urban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialn-us-ilen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-15T15:31:51Z
dc.date.available2017-09-15T15:31:51Z
dc.date.copyright2017en_US
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/111385
dc.descriptionThesis: M.C.P., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Urban Studies and Planning, 2017.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn Macon County, Illinois, one of the most recent and high profile economic development strategies involves the creation of the Midwest Inland Port (MIP), an inland port and intermodal facility. A privately owned public initiative, MIP is an infrastructure-strategy package. Part of the infrastructure includes an intermodal ramp, which is privately owned by ADM, a multinational agricultural processor. The intermodal ramp was funded, in part, by a grant from the state of Illinois. However, neither the grant application nor agreement required an impact assessment of the facility. I argue that a unique confluence of place-based factors facilitated the creation of the MIP and that a preliminary impact assessment should have been included as part of the grant application and agreement, especially in light of the high expectations for the facility. I propose a potential impact assessment methodology that considers transportation and economic impacts at the state, region, and county scales. I apply this methodology to MIP as an illustrative example. Though it is realistically too soon to determine the measurable impact of MIP, I show a means of measuring the potential impact on rail shipments and on local residents. This research enumerates a methodology that examines multi-scale impacts of transportation projects; it explains how a confluence of factors aligned to create a hybrid economic development-infrastructure model; and finally, it raises the possibility of utilizing large transportation infrastructure projects as a means of understanding industrial relations in Illinois.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Erin Kenney.en_US
dc.format.extent82 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectUrban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.title"Super-Port to the World?" : an impact assessment of the Midwest Inland Porten_US
dc.title.alternativeImpact assessment of the Midwest Inland Porten_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.C.P.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Urban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc1003291707en_US


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