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dc.contributor.advisorDavid Simchi-Levi and Roy Welsch.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMyers, Julius (Julius Scott)en_US
dc.contributor.otherLeaders for Global Operations Program.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-15T15:38:28Z
dc.date.available2017-09-15T15:38:28Z
dc.date.copyright2017en_US
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/111535
dc.descriptionThesis: M.B.A., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Sloan School of Management, in conjunction with the Leaders for Global Operations Program at MIT, 2017.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M. in Engineering Systems, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Institute for Data, Systems, and Society, in conjunction with the Leaders for Global Operations Program at MIT, 2017.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 60-61).en_US
dc.description.abstractAircraft Company X (AX) manufactures and assembles an immense variety of parts utilized as drive systems and rotor components across its multiple aircraft. The company's value proposition is maintaining the ability to build and service all legacy parts and as a result there is a great deal of variety found in its manufacturing processes. This variety stems from upgrades to manufacturing technology, improvements in material science, design variations, and individual part engineering modifications. In order to be responsive to fluctuating demand while minimizing costs, AX must broadly implement postponement into numerous applications as a way to extract the most value from its resources. This thesis uses multiple applications of postponement within AX to establish a methodology that can be used across various materials, both metallic and non-metallic. This methodology guided implementation of postponement through material physical form consolidation, material substitutions, and even provided insight into which manufacturing technique given a particular material form is optimal. The benefits are numerous to include a roughly 30% inventory reduction, improved buying power resulting in cost savings of over 10%, a reduction of material shortages by over 40%, and shorter lead times for finished goods. Extensions of these applications include aligning AX's supply chain with its suppliers utilizing identified tolerances and adding layers of postponement beyond raw material inputs.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Julius Myers.en_US
dc.format.extent61 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectSloan School of Management.en_US
dc.subjectInstitute for Data, Systems, and Society.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering Systems Division.en_US
dc.subjectLeaders for Global Operations Program.en_US
dc.titleImplementing postponement into low-volume/high-variability manufacturingen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.B.A.en_US
dc.description.degreeS.M. in Engineering Systemsen_US
dc.contributor.departmentSloan School of Management.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Institute for Data, Systems, and Society.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Engineering Systems Division.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentLeaders for Global Operations Program.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc1003324609en_US


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