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dc.contributor.advisorPierre F.J. Lermusiaux.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKulkarni, Chinmay Sameeren_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-04T15:05:51Z
dc.date.available2017-10-04T15:05:51Z
dc.date.copyright2017en_US
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/111730
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2017.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 149-164).en_US
dc.description.abstractAutonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) are a valuable resource in several oceanic applications such as security, surveillance and data collection for ocean prediction. These vehicles typically travel at speeds comparable to ocean currents, and their movement is significantly affected by these dynamic currents. Further, the speed of currents may vary greatly with depth. Hence, path planning to generate safe and fast vehicle trajectories in such a three-dimensional environment becomes crucial for the successful operation of these vehicles. In addition, many marine vehicles can only move in specific directions and with a speed that is dependent on the direction of travel. Such constraints must be respected in order to plan safe and optimal paths. Thus, our motivation in this thesis is to study path planning for vehicles with and without motion constraints in three-dimensional dynamic flow-fields. We utilize the time-optimal path planning methodology given by Lolla et al. (2012) for this purpose. In this thesis, we first review some existing path planning methods (both in two and three-dimensional settings). Then, we discuss the theoretical basis of the rigorous partial differential equation based methodology that is utilized in order to plan safe and optimal paths. This is followed by an elaborate discussion about the application of this methodology to the various types of marine vehicles. We then look at the robust and accurate numerical methods developed in order to solve the governing equations for the path planning methodology with high accuracy in real ocean domains. We illustrate the working and capabilities of our path planning algorithm by means of a number of applications. First we study some benchmark examples with known analytical solutions. Second, we look at more complex flow-fields that analytically model different oceanic flows. Finally, we look at the path planning for different types of marine vehicles in a realistic ocean domain to illustrate the capabilities of the path planning methodology and the developed numerical framework.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Chinmay Sameer Kulkarni.en_US
dc.format.extent164 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.titleThree-dimensional time-optimal path planning in dynamic and realistic environmentsen_US
dc.title.alternative3-dimensional time-optimal path planning in dynamic and realistic environmentsen_US
dc.title.alternative3-D time-optimal path planning in dynamic and realistic environmentsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc1004239689en_US


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