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dc.contributor.advisorWilliam Deringer.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCowan, Thomas C., S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Program in Science, Technology and Society.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-30T15:27:52Z
dc.date.available2017-10-30T15:27:52Z
dc.date.copyright2017en_US
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/112017
dc.descriptionThesis: S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Program in Science, Technology and Society, 2017.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 51-55).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Visa credit card network and the Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunications (Swift) network both provide a backbone for financial interchange across the world. Visa's network connects consumers, merchants, banks, and processors to ease the purchases of millions of consumer-facing products worldwide. Swift's interbank network connects banks, corporates, and other financial institutions to ease the flow of high-value, highly-secure international financial transactions. Both networks grew to become industry incumbents in the second half of the 20th century, connecting nearly every country on earth. However, the globalized networks differ in their organizational structures: Visa utilizes a centralized, U.S. focused, hub-and-spoke model; Swift uses a decentralized, transaction-volume neutral, point-to-point network. Although Visa's centralized network fosters innovation, standardization, and security, its U.S.-centered hub pulls the organization from global neutrality and aligns it with the United States on global issues. Meanwhile, although Swift's decentralized network nurtures technological localization-at the expense of technological standardizationits transaction-based global governing structure promotes a relative international neutrality among global organizations. This contrast between Visa and Swift-both networks that balance local and global, centralized and decentralized, and technical and non-technical tensions across the world-reveals the structural effects of worldwide networks, and how network system design impacts global stakeholders in the societies that they touch.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Thomas C. Cowan.en_US
dc.format.extent55 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectProgram in Science, Technology and Society.en_US
dc.titleNetwork control in a globalized world : how Visa and Swift's founding structures serve their stakeholders on the International stageen_US
dc.title.alternativeHow Visa and Swift's founding structures serve their stakeholders on the International stageen_US
dc.title.alternativeHow Visa and the Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunications founding structures serve their stakeholders on the International stageen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.B.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Program in Science, Technology and Society.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc1006377610en_US


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