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dc.contributor.advisorJohn S. Carroll.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGrunberg, Rebecca Len_US
dc.contributor.otherSloan School of Management.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-30T15:28:39Z
dc.date.available2017-10-30T15:28:39Z
dc.date.copyright2017en_US
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/112035
dc.descriptionThesis: Ph. D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Sloan School of Management, 2017.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 86-92).en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines external stressors, perceived stress, and performance, using daily experience sampling data from undergraduate students during their final exam week. First, I investigate external stressors and the timing of perceived stress. Consistent with prior literature, I find that overall perceived stress negatively predicts semester GPA. However, looking more closely at perceived stress over time, I find that perceived stress on exam days did not predict semester grade point average (GPA), while perceived stress on non-exam days significantly negatively predicted semester GPA. Those individuals who experience high perceived stress even outside the temporal bounds of external stressors never have time to recover from the exertion of coping with stress. Then, once individuals feel stressed, one factor that may change how they respond is their beliefs about whether stress is enhancing or debilitating. I investigate the effects of these stress mindsets on the relationship between stress and performance. Results show that stress mindset moderates the relationship between stress and performance, such that the relationship between stress and performance is more negative the more individuals endorse a stress-is-debilitating mindset. I also provide evidence that this effect is partially explained by stress mindset's moderating effect on the relationship between stress and motivation. Together, these findings show that a more complete understanding of the relationship between stress and performance requires examination of both external stressors and perceived stress. Experience sampling methods such as used here provide the opportunity to study all of these variables. This research also has practical implications. Traditional stress management techniques that focus solely on reducing stress may be inadequate at best; both the timing of perceived stress relative to external stressors and individuals' stress mindset provide promising avenues for intervention.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Rebecca L. Grunberg.en_US
dc.format.extent106 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectSloan School of Management.en_US
dc.titleTiming, mindset, and the link between stress and performance : evidence from experience sampling dataen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentSloan School of Management.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc1006384756en_US


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