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dc.contributor.advisorNancy G. Leveson.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHall, Harding Jen_US
dc.contributor.otherSystem Design and Management Program.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-30T15:29:54Z
dc.date.available2017-10-30T15:29:54Z
dc.date.copyright2017en_US
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/112064
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M. in Engineering and Management, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, System Design and Management Program, 2017.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 60-65).en_US
dc.description.abstractAlthough the use of anti-neoplastic chemotherapy provides benefit to patients with both malignant and non-malignant diseases, the use of these agents can be at times associated with safety concerns for both patients and the healthcare workers that administer the medication. In order to mitigate the risks or hazards that are identified there are several potential tools to consider. The tool considered for this thesis will be applying a System Theoretic Accident Model and Processes (STAMP). STAMP is used to investigate the safety of complex systems involving humans, organizations, computers, and other equipment. STAMP has the advantage of facilitating the understanding of highly complicated environments where traditional safety techniques become too costly and cumbersome and hence less efficient. "In the traditional causality models, accidents are considered to be caused by chains of failure events, each failure directly causing the next one in the chain" (Leveson, Engineering a Safer World, 2011). This view is rather different from the perspective taken by STAMP. In STAMP, accidents arise from complex processes involving, not just component failures and faults, but also system design errors, unintended component interactions, human errors, management oversight inadequacies, and more (Leveson, 2011). This thesis presents the "control structure" component of STPA as derived from inputs from healthcare workers particular to the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. The suggested control structure will ultimately lay the groundwork for future work on a detailed Systems-Theoretic Process Analysis (STPA) and generate specific recommendations to help address the identified risks and hazards in addressing patient safety issues.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Harding J. Hall.en_US
dc.format.extent65 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectEngineering and Management Program.en_US
dc.subjectSystem Design and Management Program.en_US
dc.titleApplying System-Theoretic Accident Model Process view to patient safety for treatment with oral chemotherapy and anti-cancer drugsen_US
dc.title.alternativeApplying STAMP view to patient safety for treatment with oral chemotherapy and anti-cancer drugsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M. in Engineering and Managementen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Engineering and Management Program.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentSystem Design and Management Program.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentSystem Design and Management Program
dc.identifier.oclc1006731083en_US


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