Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorAlexander Slocum.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCao, Cyndia Aen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-05T19:18:43Z
dc.date.available2017-12-05T19:18:43Z
dc.date.copyright2017en_US
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/112569
dc.descriptionThesis: S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2017.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 97-99).en_US
dc.description.abstractNuclear power accounts for about 20% of the electricity generated in the United States today [29], but conventional reserves of terrestrial uranium are estimated to be depleted within the century [19]. Fortunately, an estimated 4.5 billion tonnes of uranium exists as ions in the ocean [281, and a system of adsorbent polymers has been designed to extract the uranium. A proposed machine to harvest seawater uranium, the Symbiotic Machine for Ocean uRanium Extraction (SMORE), is fixed to a floating wind turbine and requires 550 kW to power four nets of shell enclosures containing the adsorbent and the chemical processing required to remove the uranium and reuse the polymer [161. Given the high energy density of ocean waves, this thesis explores the potential of wave energy converters to provide the power requirements of SMORE. Each net requires 92 kW of power, or about 1100 kNm to drive continuous movement at 0.087 rad/s. This thesis found that harnessing that amount of power would require a heaving buoy of 11.5 m diameter and 1 m height, though the large geometry and range of motion caused structural concerns. In contrast, a pitching buoy of 4.7 m diameter and 2 m height could provide the same amount of power, and the structure could be more easily reinforced with only one moving body. Various configurations of pitching buoys are discussed as well. While this thesis defined a first order approximation of a future system, the modeling of realistic sea states and several mechanical optimizations need to be explored further. The integration of some electronics to power the chemical processing tanks and optimize the response control of the buoy may also provide benefit at a small increase in cost. Using a wave energy converter reduces not only the power load on the turbine, but also may decrease the incident wave loads and stabilization requirements of the turbine [13]. Further cost analysis is required, but a future implementation of this wave energy converter could add great value to both the uranium harvesting system and floating wind turbine.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Cyndia A. Cao.en_US
dc.format.extent99 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.titleExploration of configurations of wave energy converters to mechanically drive a seawater uranium harvesteren_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.B.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering
dc.identifier.oclc1013188547en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record