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dc.contributor.advisorJeffrey H. Lang.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Stephanie, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-20T17:24:42Z
dc.date.available2017-12-20T17:24:42Z
dc.date.copyright2017en_US
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/112836
dc.descriptionThesis: M. Eng., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 2017.en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student-submitted PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 67-69).en_US
dc.description.abstractPiezoresistive carbon black/polydimethysiloxane (CB/PDMS) is a widely used material in the field of artificial skin development because of its high gauge factor to all forms of stress, including tension, compression and shear. While its durability, inexpensive-ness and customizability make CB/PDMS makes it the quintessential active material for pressure-sensing skin, the material itself has not been well-characterized electrically or mechanically. A series of mechanical tests on 0.625" cubes of CB/PDMS revealed that the material's resistance increases monotonically with strain and that CB/PDMS have similar sensitivities to tension and compression across different CB concentrations. Shear sensitivity, however, was relatively poor and inconsistent between samples. To overcome this lack of sensitivity to shear forces, a hair-inspired "pillar" sensor was designed to detect shear forces. The pillar sensor contains two 2 mm x 2 mm x 28 mm CB/PDMS strain gauges embedded in a 3 mm thick PDMS base, and a silicone pillar that has a 5 mm diameter and 6 mm height. Unlike the CB/PDMS cubes, the pillar sensors were very sensitivity to shear forces and presented resistance changes of up to 10% per 0.5 mm until a deflection angle of 20°. These sensors also have the ability to determine the direction of pillar deflection, exhibiting anisotropic behavior when the sensor is structurally constrained.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Stephanie Chen.en_US
dc.format.extent69 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectElectrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.titleTactile sensors based on soft polymersen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM. Eng.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc1015201177en_US


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