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The Parataxonomist Revolution : how a group of rural Costa Ricans discovered 10,000 new species

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dc.contributor.advisor Seth Mnookin. en_US
dc.contributor.author Kazmier, Robin Marie en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Graduate Program in Science Writing. en_US
dc.coverage.spatial nccr--- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2017-12-20T18:16:03Z
dc.date.available 2017-12-20T18:16:03Z
dc.date.copyright 2017 en_US
dc.date.issued 2017 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/112885
dc.description Thesis: S.M. in Science Writing, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Comparative Media Studies/Writing, 2017. en_US
dc.description Cataloged from PDF version of thesis. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (pages 15-16). en_US
dc.description.abstract In northwestern Costa Rica, a team of rural workers called parataxonomists has been inventorying butterfly and moth species for 30 years. Just as a paramedic provides a first round of medical care, a parataxonomist does the on-the-ground work of taxonomy-collection, preparation and data gathering-before sending a specimen on to be analyzed. The parataxonomy program, led by biologists Daniel Janzen and Winnie Hallwachs, is part of the unique conservation model of Costa Rica's Area de Conservacidn Guanacaste (ACG). Hiring local people, rather than students or academics, as permanent field researchers upset traditional research structures, but has paid off for science and for local communities. Some 10,000 new species have been identified through these efforts. The parataxonomists benefit from steady employment in areas of little economic opportunity, and in turn serve as a voice for conservation in their communities. But even as the parataxonomy model is praised abroad-and is being adopted in other countries-its future in Costa Rica is tenuous. This thesis looks at the lives of the parataxonomists of the ACG and the impact of their work. It explores the rise and fall of Costa Rica's National Biodiversity Institute (INBio) and the state of parataxonomy as a model for research and conservation. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Robin Marie Kazmier. en_US
dc.format.extent 16 pages en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights MIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Comparative Media Studies. en_US
dc.subject Graduate Program in Science Writing. en_US
dc.title The Parataxonomist Revolution : how a group of rural Costa Ricans discovered 10,000 new species en_US
dc.title.alternative How a group of rural Costa Ricans discovered ten-thousand new species en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree S.M. in Science Writing en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Comparative Media Studies. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Graduate Program in Science Writing. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 1015182977 en_US


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