Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorArup Chakraborty.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSweeney, Heather Men_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-12T20:55:34Z
dc.date.available2018-01-12T20:55:34Z
dc.date.copyright2017en_US
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/113099
dc.descriptionThesis: M. Eng., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 2017.en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student-submitted PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 38-40).en_US
dc.description.abstractUnderstanding the networks that regulate cellular processes, and how they are mis-regulated, is a major area of study. This is especially key in leukemia, where the complexity of the pathways involved and the heterogeneity between different leukemia cell strains makes it difficult to design therapies that are less vulnerable to deleterious side effects or compensatory mutations. However, despite their potential, methods to reconstruct networks are often specific to experimental technique and their exact ability to accurately capture networks is unexplored. Motivated by a shRNA knockdown experiment on leukemia cell lines treated with a PI3K inhibitor, we sought to devise and test a method to reconstruct the relevant network, which could be used to gain a deeper understanding of the networks involved in PI3K signaling in leukemia cells. We simulated a shRNA knockdown experiment on a known small network and tested an inverse Potts model for reconstructing the network based on correlations from the simulation output. We found the method did not infer the small network properly, but did produce several patterns that indicate it may have potential for revealing something of interest about larger systems. Understanding what the patterns convey about the system and devising a better method to see if that works are future steps that will allow us to see if we can apply this method to in vitro data.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Heather M. Sweeney.en_US
dc.format.extent43 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectElectrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.titleModel studies aimed toward constructing PI3K pathways in leukemia T-cells from shRNA knockdownsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM. Eng.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc1016159411en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record