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dc.contributor.advisorCharles G. Sodini.en_US
dc.contributor.authorYang, Jason, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-08T15:58:28Z
dc.date.available2018-02-08T15:58:28Z
dc.date.copyright2017en_US
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/113456
dc.descriptionThesis: M. Eng., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 2017.en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student-submitted PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 115-116).en_US
dc.description.abstractElectroencephalography (EEG) has long been used by neurologists to aid in diagnosing and treating neurological disorders ranging from sleep apnea to epilepsy. However, inherent difficulties still exist in capturing EEG data for extended periods of time on the order of days to weeks in humans. Such difficulties brought on by implementation challenges and usability ultimately lead to patient non-compliance. These challenges also curtail EEG use in sleep studies due to complexity of setup. This work aims to address these issues by extending the functionality and performance of a previously designed EEG ASIC. A design for a subdermal, implantable EEG recording system for long term EEG monitoring as well as a simplified wearable and wireless EEG sensor is realized. The implantable design is an 8-channel, 250Hz bandwidth EEG system in a 14.0mm x 15.5mm package that is wirelessly powered by an external device through inductively coupled coils with backscattering. The device is placed subdermally above the skull for continuous patient EEG monitoring for up to a month to aid neurologists with epilepsy diagnosis. This device is especially important given the severity of antiepileptic drugs' side-effects. The performance of this device is verified through animal studies in pigs. This work is also extended to the design of a wearable, wireless EEG patch for sleep studies. The device is a 20mm x 24mm, 4-channel, 250Hz bandwidth, Bluetooth Low-Energy (BTLE) electronics package with adhesive electrodes that can be quickly applied. This device is aimed to assist neurologists and clinicians perform sleep studies. Results are verified using sleep data collected on the author.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Jason Yang.en_US
dc.format.extent116 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectElectrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.titleDesign and testing of wearable and long-term subdermal implantable electroencephalogramsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM. Eng.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
dc.identifier.oclc1020180344en_US


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