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dc.contributor.advisorThomas W. Malone.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHalaby, Aceilen_US
dc.contributor.otherSystem Design and Management Program.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-08T16:27:13Z
dc.date.available2018-02-08T16:27:13Z
dc.date.copyright2017en_US
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/113514
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M. in Engineering and Management, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, System Design and Management Program, 2017.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (page 95).en_US
dc.description.abstractIt is no doubt that globalization and free trade have brought competitive advantages of Innovation Driven Enterprises (I.D.E.s) to new levels. More specifically, managers are focused on improving and maximizing team collaboration to both increase capacity and utilization of their in-house talent and optimize company throughput and output. It has long been argued that performance and output are attributed to leadership, management and/or recruiting. However, new management and cognitive theories argue that optimizing output and team performance is now more of a science rather than just a conventional wisdom; conceiving a winning team now involves both predictive and nurturing responsibilities. This applies to all fields be it military, product development, medical, business, engineering and others to name a few. This thesis focuses on the new field of Integrated Design Management whereby multidisciplinary, innovative engines or product development teams are becoming essential entities for entrepreneurial survival and versatility during economic uncertainty. How can a product designer, an engineer and a businessman work together efficiently'? What makes the team perform better? Are there any rules for engagement or does skill lead output? How are people selected as part of a team? This thesis argues that creating an optimal product team should not be a stroke of luck but rather the result of applying new management sciences and team dynamics to better recruit and build for collaboration in today's fast-changing and competitive world. I believe that studying the correlation between three variables: compassion, collective intelligence and output in Integrated Design Management (I.D.M.) teams can lead to positive inferences relating to team formation and competitive work cultures. Through methods of measuring the latter variables in addition to observing product team habits and recording interviews with individuals enrolled in the I.D.M. program at MIT, the following thesis maps predictive variables across a system for nurturing successful team collaboration and output. The model constructed to forecast product team output, produced an r2 of 0.57, setting a benchmark for future models. This research also provides a template for future applications across multiple industries aimed at conceiving more collaborative teams with exceptional skills whose members may have been more comfortable working in isolation at the expense of creativity and efficiency.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Aceil Halaby.en_US
dc.format.extent95 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectEngineering and Management Program.en_US
dc.subjectIntegrated Design and Management Program.en_US
dc.subjectSystem Design and Management Program.en_US
dc.titleForecasting collaboration capacity by driving output in product teamsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M. in Engineering and Managementen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Engineering and Management Program.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Integrated Design and Management Program.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentSystem Design and Management Program.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc1020073551en_US


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