Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorKai von Fintel, Danny Fox, and Irene Heim.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHirsch, Aron, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Linguistics and Philosophy.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-16T20:05:36Z
dc.date.available2018-02-16T20:05:36Z
dc.date.copyright2017en_US
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/113782
dc.descriptionThesis: Ph. D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Linguistics and Philosophy, 2017.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 305-323).en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis studies operators such as and and only, which occur in a broad range of environments. And, for instance, appears between sentences, intransitive verbs, quantifiers, and so forth. One line of analysis assigns and/only a "cross-categorial" semantics flexible enough to compose with different arguments. This thesis challenges that view, pursuing the "Semantic Inflexibility Hypothesis" (SIH). Regardless of the surface string, and and only uniformly operate on a meaning characteristic of a sentence -- a truth-value or proposition. The thesis presents four case studies testing a central prediction of the SIH: that when and/only appear to compose with an expression having a non-sentential meaning, there must be covert syntax underlying to furnish an appropriate scope site. Most of the cases involve object DPs: (a) apparent object DP conjunction in basic sentences (John saw every student and every professor) and (b) in pseudo-clefts (What Obama approved was this bill and that bill), along with (c) only preceding an object DP (John learned only one language). The additional case study examines coordination of questions. Novel diagnostics reveal covert syntax in each case, reconciling the data with the SIH -- and, in some cases, leading to a new perspective on the construction. In addition to showing that a range of data may be parsed with covert syntax, I present reason to question whether cross-categorial meanings are available at all. Specifically, I point out that crosscategorial analyses over-generate. First: the mechanisms which give rise to cross-categorial meanings are too powerful, and predict more operators to be cross-categorial than actually are. Second, I show that if and itself were cross-categorial, unattested scope readings would derive. If there are no crosscategorial operators, the over-generation problems resolve without new constraints.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Aron Hirsch.en_US
dc.format.extent323 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectLinguistics and Philosophy.en_US
dc.titleAn inflexible semantics for cross-categorial operatorsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Linguistics and Philosophy.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Linguistics and Philosophy
dc.identifier.oclc1022566399en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record