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dc.contributor.advisorDaniel H. Rothman.en_US
dc.contributor.authorYi, Robert Snghoen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-16T20:06:05Z
dc.date.available2018-02-16T20:06:05Z
dc.date.copyright2017en_US
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/113794
dc.descriptionThesis: Ph. D. in Geophysics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, 2017.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 99-107).en_US
dc.description.abstractGroundwater-fed rivers form stunning geometries over a range of scales. These rivers grow as water from an underground aquifer reemerges and erodes the overlying topography. Both the aquifer and the overlying topography generate flows along diffusive gradients. We study three features produced by these gradients over different scales: the shape of the valley that forms around a single stream, the network-averaged planform stream shape, and the shape of the drainage basin. First, we identify a new feature in stream valleys - a spatially variable diffusivity - that gives rise to a theoretical valley shape that agrees with the shapes of real valleys. Next, we present evidence and theory for a 120° opening stream confluence angle as a result of lateral rearrangement of streams in response to the pressure field generated by the aquifer. We then study how this mechanism exerts itself on the scale of the network. Finally, we widen our scope and analyze river planform morphology on a continental scale. We identify how branching angles can predict a river basin aspect ratio. We find a relationship between this aspect ratio and river basin scaling exponents with local climate.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Robert Sngho Yi.en_US
dc.format.extent107 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectEarth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences.en_US
dc.titleEmergent geometries of groundwater-fed riversen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D. in Geophysicsen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences
dc.identifier.oclc1022851464en_US


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