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Thirteen ways of looking : a theoretical inquiry in computational creative thinking

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dc.contributor.advisor George Stiny and Patrick Winston. en_US
dc.contributor.author Turakhia, Dishita Girish en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2018-03-02T21:39:09Z
dc.date.available 2018-03-02T21:39:09Z
dc.date.copyright 2017 en_US
dc.date.issued 2017 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/113918
dc.description Thesis: S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Architecture, 2017. en_US
dc.description Thesis: S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 2017. en_US
dc.description This electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections. en_US
dc.description Cataloged from student-submitted PDF version of thesis. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (pages 97-99). en_US
dc.description.abstract The vision of this research is to propose a novel computational framework to study Creative Thinking. If we are to embed machines with creative thinking abilities, then we first need to study the evanescent nature of human creative thinking. Creative thinking is neither entirely random nor strictly logical, making it difficult to t its computation into structured logical models of thinking. Given this conundrum, how can we computationally study the process of thinking creatively? In this research, I first present the current scientific definitions of creative thinking. Through literary survey of cognitive, computational and design thinking frameworks, I identify the missing links between human creativity and AI models of creative thinking. I assert that creative thinking is result of two features of human intelligence, cognitive diversity and social interaction. Cognitive diversity or the ability to parse knowledge in dierent ways is a crucial aspect of creative thinking. Furthermore, social interaction between cognitively diverse individuals results in restructuring of thoughts leading to creativity and epiphanies (the aha moments). I posit that Shape Grammar, with its ability to fluidly restructure computation, can be used to study and demonstrate cognitive diversity and interaction. If we conceive thoughts as shapes and ideas as configurations of those shapes, then cognitive diversity can be described as rule-based computation on shapes to generate those configurations; and interaction as the exchange of rules between cognitive diverse entities (humans or machines). The contributions of this research are threefold. First, I present a literature review of current frameworks, and identify the two gaps between machine and human creativity. Secondly, I demonstrate how shape grammar can ll those gaps of cognitive diversity and interaction. Thirdly, I propose thought-shape framework that adapts principles of shape grammar for computational creative thinking. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Dishita Girish Turakhia. en_US
dc.format.extent 99 pages en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights MIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Architecture. en_US
dc.subject Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. en_US
dc.title Thirteen ways of looking : a theoretical inquiry in computational creative thinking en_US
dc.title.alternative Theoretical inquiry in computational creative thinking en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree S.M. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 1023434010 en_US


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