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dc.contributor.advisorSusan Murcott.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDumas, Marion (Marion M.)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-12T19:30:38Z
dc.date.available2018-03-12T19:30:38Z
dc.date.copyright2006en_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/114118
dc.descriptionThesis: S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, 2006.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis. Some pages in the original thesis contain text that is illegible.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 91-93).en_US
dc.description.abstractAs of 2002, 1.1 billion people lacked access to clean water, causing several million deahts each year from highly-infectious enteric diseases. It has been recognized that an appropriate way of addressing this problem may be to enhance the effectiveness and the usage of house-hold water treatment and storage (HWTS) systems. Ceramic filters are examples of HWTS systems. Ceramic filters decrease the concentration of bacteria by pore size filtration but are not able to filter the nanometer-size viruses. It is proposed that adding an adequate amount of metal oxides to the clay before firing the filters would allow the ceramic to adsorb the viruses present in the water. This thesis takes two steps towards evaluating this proposition. It demonstrates the microbiological methods needed to assess the presence of viruses in water and to carry out experiments with bacteriophages, used as model viruses. It also presents the theory necessary to understand, measure and model virus adsorption to surfaces.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Marion Dumas.en_US
dc.format.extent104 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectEarth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences.en_US
dc.titleMethods for the study of virus adsorption to metal oxide in order to improve ceramic water filtersen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.B.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc1027706545en_US


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