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dc.contributor.advisorThomas Herring.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKochanski, Kelly Anneen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialn-us-aken_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-12T19:30:56Z
dc.date.available2018-03-12T19:30:56Z
dc.date.copyright2015en_US
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/114125
dc.descriptionThesis: S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, 2015.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 49-50).en_US
dc.description.abstractMost GPS stations in Alaska show apparent seasonal variations on the order of one centimeter. The majority of these stations move downwards throughout the winter, a motion which is in phase with regional snowfall and has been attributed to hydrological loading (Fu et. al., 2012). The range of phases across the state, however, spans half the year and does not correlate with snow patterns. Six stations show discontinuous seasonal variations on the order of 1-10cm. After examining the geography and windspeed at these sites, we conclude that at least three of them will accumulate rime ice during the winter, and that this ice can cause apparent upwards motions of the stations. This hypothesis is supported by seasonal variations in the stations' multipath values, which indicate increased signal scattering during the winter.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Kelly Anne Kochanski.en_US
dc.format.extent50 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectEarth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences.en_US
dc.titleIce and the apparent variation of GPS station positions for Alaskaen_US
dc.title.alternativeIce and the apparent variation of Global Positioning System station positions for Alaskaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.B.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc1027723156en_US


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