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dc.contributor.advisorAdam C. Martin.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHeer, Natalie C. (Natalie Claire)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Biology.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-23T16:29:54Z
dc.date.available2018-05-23T16:29:54Z
dc.date.copyright2018en_US
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/115678
dc.descriptionThesis: Ph. D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Biology, 2018.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.description.abstractCreating biological form requires the generation of forces to rearrange tissues, as well as the patterning and organizational control of those forces to create the correct shapes. Force generation by actomyosin networks is a major driver of morphogenesis across many systems. The organization of actomyosin networks across multiple length scales is critical in generating biological form, including the Drosophila melanogaster ventral furrow. Using quantitative microscopy to measure the pattern of transcription, signaling, myosin activation, and cell shape in the Drosophila mesoderm, I found that cells within the ventral domain accumulate different amounts of active apical non-muscle myosin 2 depending on their distance from the ventral midline. This gradient in active myosin depends on a newly quantified gradient in upstream signaling proteins, including the transcription factor Twist. Experimental broadening of the myosin domain in vivo disrupts tissue curvature where active myosin is uniform. From this data, I argue that apical contractility gradients are important for tissue folding. Finally, I found that the gradient in active myosin is shaped by inhibitors of RhoA signaling downstream of the Twist gradient. This work improves our of understanding how actomyosin activity at the tissue level in the Drosophila ventral furrow is organized and how that organization impacts biological form.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Natalie C. Heer.en_US
dc.format.extent109 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectBiology.en_US
dc.titleTaking shape : the path to myosin activation in the Drosophila ventral furrowen_US
dc.title.alternativePath to myosin activation in the Drosophila ventral furrowen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Biology.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc1036985595en_US


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