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dc.contributor.advisorTimothy L. Grove and Denton S. Ebel.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHylton, Shavonne Nyoka, 1983-en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-22T14:28:04Z
dc.date.available2018-08-22T14:28:04Z
dc.date.copyright2005en_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/117442
dc.descriptionThesis: S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, 2005.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis. "May 2005." "This thesis was submitted to the Institute Archives without all the required signatures."--Disclaimer Notice page.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 19-[21]).en_US
dc.description.abstractCompound chondrules (CCs) are two or more chondrules fused or mechanically joined together. Studies of compound chondrules have been conducted in order to understand the chondrule formation process, including the environment and precursor materials. Chondrule formation is still not currently understood and much doubt still remains as to whether the chondrule formation process is nebular and/or planetary However, our evidence suggests that a primary and secondary process are responsible for CCs: (1) semi-molten collisions among individual (I) chondrules (Gooding and Keil, 1981) and (2) Parent-body impacts that cause jostling, fracturing and compaction (Wasson et al., 1995). By understanding chondrule collisions and impacts we can gain greater knowledge into what was happening during early solar system formation, including mean interparticle distances and velocities (Gooding and Keil, 1981). This thesis introduces x-ray tomography as a new method of measuring and surveying CCs; and explores the advantages and limitations of this method. A 3-D tomographic study of two CR carbonaceous meteorites, Acfer139 and Renazzo, reveals a higher frequency of compound chondrules in CR chondrites than in ordinary chondrites. Previous two-dimensional studies of compound chondrules are reexamined and two new categories, touching and aggregate compounds, are also introduced. Our reexamination suggests a 9.6% frequency of compound chondrules (excluding the new categories), twice more than the value of 4% found by Gooding and Keil (1981) and almost 4 times the value of 2.4% found by Wasson et al. (1995) in their studies of ordinary chondrites. The implications of a higher compound chondrule frequency on chondrule formation are also examined.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Shavonne N. Hylton.en_US
dc.format.extent20, 1 unnumbered pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectEarth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences.en_US
dc.titleA 3-D tomographic survey of compound chondrules in two carbonaceous chondrites : Acfer 139 and Renazzoen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.B.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc1048399931en_US


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