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dc.contributor.advisorJessika E. Trancik.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAdcock, Christianeen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-17T14:50:18Z
dc.date.available2018-09-17T14:50:18Z
dc.date.copyright2018en_US
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/117803
dc.descriptionThesis: S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2018.en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student-submitted PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 39-40).en_US
dc.description.abstractPredicting the fuel economy of future light-duty vehicles provides insight into the expected greenhouse gas emissions, oil consumption, and operating costs in the transportation sector. Fuel economy is difficult to directly predict, however, due to the large number of vehicle characteristics that influence fuel economy. These characteristics include curb weight, powertrain efficiency, tire properties, and aerodynamic properties. In addition, the characteristics vary by powertrain technology and vehicle class. This study evaluates past trends and literature projections for each attribute. It then projects fuel economy for three powertrain technologies and eight vehicle classes using current values, past trends, and literature projections for the vehicle characteristics and the Environmental Protection Agency's drive cycles. Fuel economy for internal combustion engine vehicles (ICEVs), hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and battery electric vehicles (BEVs) are projected to increase at rates similar to past years. At these rates, average HEVs and BEVs will significantly exceed Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards for 2021 and 2025, and ICEVs will fall significantly short of these standards. This analysis provides an easily adaptable framework to project fuel economy that accounts for the large number of contributing vehicle characteristics.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Christiane Adcock.en_US
dc.format.extent40 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.titleEvaluating Trends in Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies to Project Fuel Economyen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.B.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc1051458539en_US


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