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dc.contributor.advisorJanelle Knox-Hayes.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBanuelos, Liana (Liana M.)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Urban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-28T20:59:25Z
dc.date.available2018-09-28T20:59:25Z
dc.date.copyright2018en_US
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/118266
dc.descriptionThesis: M.C.P., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Urban Studies and Planning, 2018.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 91-93).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe most pronounced climate change effects in northeastern United States will be increased precipitation events, more frequent heat waves, and substantial sea level rise. These temperature and flooding outcomes place substantial risk on vital infrastructure that supports economic development, public health, and access to resources and amenities within the state of Massachusetts. As such, there is a need to mitigate these risks through long-range planning and climate change adaptation strategies. The Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT) recognizes that infrastructure must be fortified through these methods but has yet to establish a systematic approach for quantifying climate change impacts, evaluating the costs and benefits of selective intervention, and implementing adaptation strategies. However, MassDOT operates within a complex political setting of constraints and conditions that may or may not be conducive to particular implementation mechanisms. Additionally, the hydrologic modeling and spatial analysis needed to identify specific areas of transportation infrastructure that are especially vulnerable to climate change effects will not be completed until late 2018. Cognizant of these constraints, this thesis aims to (1) synthesize the best climate change resiliency strategies from other large infrastructure owners/DOTs and (2) draw upon lessons learned from other agencies to recommend strategies for overcoming barriers to institutionalization at MassDOT. In this way, the department will have a roadmap to addressing existing gaps and barriers to implementation once the climate adaptation and vulnerability assessment tool has been developed. By strategically protecting infrastructure that will have the greatest benefit to MassDOT's constituents at the least cost, the department will be able to minimize the impacts of climate change and maintain a satisfying level of service despite increasing climate stresses on infrastructure and operations.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Liana Banuelos.en_US
dc.format.extent93 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectUrban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.titleOvercoming Barriers to Institutionalize Climate Change Resiliency Practices : MassDOTen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.C.P.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Urban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Urban Studies and Planning
dc.identifier.oclc1054179044en_US


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