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dc.contributor.advisorTakehiko Nagakura.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKoh, Hunminen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture.en_US
dc.coverage.spatiala-ko--- a-cc---en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-15T20:23:15Z
dc.date.available2018-10-15T20:23:15Z
dc.date.copyright2018en_US
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/118513
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M. in Architecture Studies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Architecture, 2018.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 58-61).en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines the East Asian geometric silk pattern. Despite its long history of use in traditional architecture as an ornamental element in Korea and China, a little attempt was made to understand its geometric construction. Also, the connection between the silk patterns in two countries are often neglected because of the lack of systematic archiving. I first present the currently existing examples of silk patterns in Korea and China. Through a comparative analysis, I identify that the pattern is a shared heritage of the region and proses that more holistic approach is required to understand its relation with geometric patterns from other cultures. One of the approach is symmetry analysis, a method used in archeology to identify relevance in material culture between two adjacent cultural groups. Subsequently, I present shape analysis of existing sixfold symmetry silk patterns and argue that the stacking order of basic motifs plays an important role in design of the majority of silk patterns. I devised a symbolic notation system to identify different stacking order between different designs. Based on the analysis, I introduce an automated pattern generator which creates patterns with a specific symmetry in batches. The produced images can be used to train a symmetry classifier based on a machine learning model. I discuss possible implementations of the pattern generator and the symmetry classifier model and outline future development and challenges.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Hunmin Koh.en_US
dc.format.extent66, 9 unnumbered pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
dc.titleShape analysis for digital representation of East Asian silk patternsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M. in Architecture Studiesen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture
dc.identifier.oclc1054763548en_US


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