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dc.contributor.advisorDomitilla Del Vecchio.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBarajas, Carlos, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-22T18:47:04Z
dc.date.available2018-10-22T18:47:04Z
dc.date.copyright2018en_US
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/118737
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2018.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 133-138).en_US
dc.description.abstractA premier challenge facing synthetic biology is achieving robust performance of synthetic circuits as they share transcription and translational resource amongst each other and the host-cell. It is important to model the full physics of cellular-resource sharing when designing genetic circuits to ensure robustness. Current models used in synthetic and systems biology lack the ability to account for the nontrivial spatial distribution of resources and genes that has been experimentally observed. The first part of this thesis introduces a model consisting of a set of partial differential equitations (PDE's) that captures the experimentally observed spatial information in the cell and it is framed in a resource sharing context. A comparison of gene expression, circuit-circuit and circuit-host-cell interactions between the proposed model and the commonly used well-mixed ordinary differential equations (ODE's) model is provided. An efficient numerical method to solve the PDE's is given and regimes where the set of PDE's can be simplified to ODE's by simply adjusting the effective ribosome binding strength (RBS) of each genetic circuit is discussed. It is envisioned that a centralized controller which regulates resource production can be implemented to ensure robust circuit performance. The second half of this thesis introduces an actuator which can be used to regulate resource production in the centralized controller. By tapping into the endogenous circuitry of the cell responsible for adjusting resource levels in the cell based on environmental conditions, we provide a proof-of-concept for this actuator. Theoretical and experimental results are provided to characterize the actuator performance. The actuator is then applied in an engineering context to rescue the cellular growth rate defects arising from overexpression of an exogenous protein. Finally, the actuator is also shown to minimize the coupling that arises between synthetic circuits due to resource sharing.en_US
dc.description.sponsorship"This work is supported by National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowships Program (GRFP), the Ford Foundation Fellowship, and Health (NIH) grant P50 GM098792"--Page 5.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Carlos Barajas.en_US
dc.format.extent138 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.titleUnderstanding and stimulating cellular resource transactions for robust cell growth and genetic circuit performanceen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering
dc.identifier.oclc1057284270en_US


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