Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorFikile R. Brushett.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCarney, Thomas J., Ph. D. (Thomas Joseph) Massachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-05T15:57:36Z
dc.date.available2019-02-05T15:57:36Z
dc.date.copyright2018en_US
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/120204
dc.descriptionThesis: Ph. D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 2018.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 119-136).en_US
dc.description.abstractElectrochemical energy storage will play a pivotal role in our society's energy future, providing vital services to the transportation, grid, and residential markets. Depending on the power and duration requirements of a specific application, numerous electrochemical technologies exist. For the majority of the markets, lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries are the state-of-the-art technology owing to their good cycle life and high energy density and efficiency. Their widespread penetration, however, is limited by high production cost and inherent safety concerns. Understanding the solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) which governs the performance and lifetime of these batteries is critical to developing the next generation Li-ion batteries. As an alternative to Li-ion, redox flow batteries store energy in solutions of electroactive species, which are housed in external tanks and pumped to a power-converting electroreactor. This configuration decouples power and energy, improving the safety and flexibility of the system, however, flow battery energy density is inherently lower than Li-ion and expensive ion-selective membranes are required for efficient operation. As a contrast to Li-ion and redox flow batteries, convection batteries harnesses the key benefits of Li-ion batteries and redox flow batteries while overcoming their individual limitations. By incorporating thick electrodes into the cell, the energy density is increased and the cost of the system is reduced. To overcome the diffusive losses in the thick electrodes, electrolyte is pumped through the electrodes, enabling uniform ion transport throughout the porous structure. However, thick electrodes can lead to large ohmic losses in the cell resulting in lower energy efficiency. In this thesis, I discuss my work on understanding the SEI in Li-ion batteries, highlighting the thermodynamics of its origin, characterization of its structure, and strategies for future development. I then detail my work understanding redox active molecules from molecule characterization and mechanistic generation to redox flow cell level engineering. Finally, I highlight my work in the development of the convection battery technology explaining the synthesis of active materials, thick electrode design, and fabrication of the prototype convection cell architecture. Taken together, these projects highlight the theme of achieving low-cost electrochemical energy storage through various technical pathways.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Thomas J. Carney.en_US
dc.format.extent136 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMaterials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.titleConvection enhanced electrochemical energy storageen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and Engineering
dc.identifier.oclc1082845315en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record