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dc.contributor.advisorHarriet Ritvo.en_US
dc.contributor.authorShapiro, Ryan Noahen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Program in Science, Technology and Society.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-11T19:35:52Z
dc.date.available2019-03-11T19:35:52Z
dc.date.copyright2018en_US
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/120880
dc.descriptionThesis: Ph. D. in History, Anthropology, and Science, Technology and Society (HASTS), Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Program in Science, Technology and Society, 2018.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe rhetoric and apparatus of national security have played critical roles in American controversies over animal and human experimentation from the dawn of the Twentieth Century to today's "War on Terror." Drawing on archival and Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) research, this dissertation traces how American partisans in the enduring vivisection controversy have sought to mobilize national security concerns to tar their domestic political adversaries as enemy agents of foreign enemies from the Kaiser and Hitler to Stalin and Al-Qaeda. Further, this study explores how these efforts have intersected with issues of gender, slavery, and the pathologizing of political dissent, as well as campaigns for the absolute freedom of research, the functioning of Nazism and the Holocaust in the American political imagination, civil liberties in the Post-9/11 world, and ongoing debates over animal rights, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and domestic terrorism.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Ryan Noah Shapiro.en_US
dc.format.extent641 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectProgram in Science, Technology and Society.en_US
dc.titleBodies at war : National Security in American controversies over animal & human experimentation from WWI to the War on Terroren_US
dc.title.alternativeNational Security in American controversies over animal & human experimentation from WWI to the War on Terroren_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D. in History, Anthropology, and Science, Technology and Society (HASTS)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Program in Science, Technology and Society.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Program in Science, Technology and Society
dc.identifier.oclc1088722277en_US


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