Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorRajeev J. Ram.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAggarwal, Neerja,M.Eng.Massachusetts Institute of Technology.en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-15T20:28:18Z
dc.date.available2019-07-15T20:28:18Z
dc.date.copyright2018en_US
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/121617
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis: M. Eng., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 2018en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student-submitted PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 185-192).en_US
dc.description.abstractRaman spectroscopy is a vibrational scattering technique that uses a laser to measure the spectral fingerprint of a molecule. Skin Raman has applications for noninvasive cancer diagnostics and glucose sensing. A major challenge is that skin also emits autofluorescence. This time-varying autofluorescence background reduces the Raman signal to noise ratio (SNR) and correlates spectra taken from a single patient. Before clinical trials, instruments need to be tested and developed on a human skin substitute exhibiting the same challenges. We establish a fully stratified in vitro reconstructed skin tissue model as an optical substitute with similar autofluorescence, photobleaching, and Raman peaks as in vivo human skin. Using this tissue model, we show a new procedure to manipulate tissue glucose, detect using Raman, and confirm using high performance liquid chromatography. It may also be possible to separate Raman and fluorescence in time to improve SNR. But, the near infrared (NIR) autofluorescence lifetime of skin has not been previously characterized. We built a sensitive and fast time-domain electro-optic setup and report the first skin NIR lifetime using the tissue model: [tau] = 118 - 524 ps. This work is the most extensive characterization of NIR autofluorescence of skin thus far. Researchers can use the tissue model to test, compare, and improve their instruments and algorithms for Raman sensing. It can also be used to investigate the mechanism of action for cancer Raman, study hyperspectral autofluorescence lifetime, compare optical designs, and help bring skin Raman to widespread clinical use.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Neerja Aggarwal.en_US
dc.format.extent192 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectElectrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.titleRaman and fluorescence spectroscopy of in vitro skin tissue for diagnostics and monitoringen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM. Eng.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.oclc1098036372en_US
dc.description.collectionM.Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Scienceen_US
dspace.imported2019-07-15T20:28:15Zen_US
mit.thesis.degreeMasteren_US
mit.thesis.departmentEECSen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record