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dc.contributor.advisorPatrick L. Purdon and Emery N. Brown.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMullen, Andrew Carter.en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-15T20:33:43Z
dc.date.available2019-07-15T20:33:43Z
dc.date.copyright2019en_US
dc.date.issued2019en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/121682
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis: M. Eng., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 2019en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student-submitted PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 69-71).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe focus of this thesis is identifying human physiologic markers during opiate sedation for applications in general anesthesia and drug overdose. Under this central topic, three themes are developed: characterizing the neural signature associated with altered consciousness due to opiate administration, characterizing the diminished respiration and behavioral effects of sedation due to opiate administration, and correlating these features. This work led to the development of signal processing techniques using state-space autoregressive equations to model respiratory data. Additionally, this project required designing and conducting a clinical experiment at the Massachusetts General Hospital with the permission of the Partners Institutional Review Board and the guidance of the Anesthesia, Critical Care, and Pain Management department at the Massachusetts General Hospital. The data used in this investigation were collected in the operating rooms at the Massachusetts General Hospital with the help of anesthesiologists, surgeons, nursing staff, and clinical research coordinators.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Andrew Carter Mullen.en_US
dc.format.extent71 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectElectrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.titleTechniques for the characterization of sedation due to opiate administrationen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM. Eng.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.oclc1102057211en_US
dc.description.collectionM.Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Scienceen_US
dspace.imported2019-07-15T20:33:40Zen_US
mit.thesis.degreeMasteren_US
mit.thesis.departmentEECSen_US


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