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dc.contributor.advisorNeri Oxman.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Rachel Soo Hoo.en_US
dc.contributor.otherProgram in Media Arts and Sciences (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-18T20:35:52Z
dc.date.available2019-07-18T20:35:52Z
dc.date.copyright2018en_US
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/121840
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Planning, Program in Media Arts and Sciences, 2018en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 133-141).en_US
dc.description.abstractHybrid Living Materials (HLMs) are formed by combining living and non-living materials such that the new material takes on the properties of both. Yet, the integrated control of both material and biological properties and their interactions remains challenging due to the complexity of natural constructs and the lack of standardized infrastructure to control biological function in 3D space. The state of the art remains limited in its range of scale and application scope. We seek to extend the conventions used for the digital design and fabrication of human-made structural materials to harness valuable biotic functionalities-such as sense, response, growth, metabolization, and even adaptation-to enable a diverse new class of multifunctional materials. This thesis establishes a generalizable framework and technical workflow for the creation of HLMs.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe approach integrates (i) computational design, (ii) digital fabrication, and (iii) synthetic biology to generate materials that are programmed to host and template engineered bacterial cells. Specifically, this research employs a multimaterial 3D printing platform in combination with newly developed biochemical signaling resins and volumetric modeling tools to produce additively manufactured objects containing high resolution bioactive diffusion gradients. Computer aided design (CAD) tools allow multiple genetic regulatory signals to be precisely positioned within the cured architectures of these printed shapes. When combined with hydrogel immobilization methods to sustain E. coli and facilitate biosignal transmission on these objects, this approach achieves spatial genetic regulatory control of engineered cells across complex geometries and produces functional hybrid-living materials.en_US
dc.description.abstractImportantly, the HLM fabrication platform achieves living constructs of up to half a meter in length, and accurate simulation of executable biological patterning and outputs. The platform provides design and fabrication tools that advance the merger between digital manufacturing and biological engineering for a unique level of control and repeatability over spatially-varying material properties and cellular function. Thus, the methodology, hardware, and computational design space established provide an entry point for designers, engineers, and scientists to mediate bacterial functionalities with material technology for broad application.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Rachel Soo Hoo Smith.en_US
dc.format.extent141 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectProgram in Media Arts and Sciencesen_US
dc.titleHybrid Living Materials : a digital fabrication platform for functional bacterial technologiesen_US
dc.title.alternativeHLMs : a digital fabrication platform for functional bacterial technologiesen_US
dc.title.alternativeDigital fabrication platform for functional bacterial technologiesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentProgram in Media Arts and Sciences (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)en_US
dc.identifier.oclc1108654460en_US
dc.description.collectionS.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Planning, Program in Media Arts and Sciencesen_US
dspace.imported2019-07-18T20:35:48Zen_US
mit.thesis.degreeMasteren_US
mit.thesis.departmentMediaen_US


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