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dc.contributor.advisorGeorge Stiny.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCarlsson, Moa Karolina.en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture.en_US
dc.coverage.spatiale-uk---en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-22T19:32:38Z
dc.date.available2019-07-22T19:32:38Z
dc.date.copyright2019en_US
dc.date.issued2019en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/121875
dc.descriptionThesis: Ph. D. in Architecture: Design and Computation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Architecture, 2019en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis. "The pagination in this thesis reflects how it was delivered to the Institute Archives and Special Collections. Figure images not found in original thesis"--Disclaimer Notice page.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 257-287).en_US
dc.description.abstractIn the decades after World War II-a period that saw the accelerated transformation of Britain's countryside into a modem industrial landscape-the visual appearance of the country was placed at the center of debates about identity, progress, and heritage. Among a vocal and interested public, the proliferating power stations, power transmission lines, open-pit mines, dams, motorways, and oil-related facilities were often felt as threats to the national past, to cultural values, and to the very idea of what it meant to be British. Amidst this political complexity, the computer-generated diagram, with its underlying mathematical structure, may seem an unlikely vehicle for settling planning disputes about Britain's countryside. My study reveals how landscape practitioners, hired by industrial developers, began to exploit the general characteristics of mainframe computers (speed, accuracy, replicability, and economy) to define new ways of representing and measuring visual phenomena, and of comparing alternative visions of the country, using quantitative "facts." The result was a digital technology-seeing systems-that enumerated and quantified rather than depicted visual landscape, a new technology that profoundly transformed not only visualization and representation practices, but that also ensured continued industrial expansion.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Moa Karolina Carlsson.en_US
dc.format.extent287 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
dc.titleSeeing systems and the beholding eye : computer-aided visions of the postwar British landscapeen_US
dc.title.alternativeComputer-aided visions of the postwar British landscapeen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D. in Architecture: Design and Computationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architectureen_US
dc.identifier.oclc1102636089en_US
dc.description.collectionPh.D.inArchitecture:DesignandComputation Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Architectureen_US
dspace.imported2019-07-22T19:32:36Zen_US
mit.thesis.degreeDoctoralen_US
mit.thesis.departmentArchen_US


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