Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorKenneth Kamrin.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChantharayukhonthorn, Maytee.en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-16T21:16:49Z
dc.date.available2019-09-16T21:16:49Z
dc.date.copyright2019en_US
dc.date.issued2019en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/122146
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2019en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 95-98).en_US
dc.description.abstractCapturing the propagation of microscale physics to macroscale phenomena is intractable for many large systems. Scale propagation is a major issue in granular media, wherein two extremes are often taken. In one, granular materials are modeled as a continuum, which greatly reduces the number of degrees of freedom that describe the system and can thus be simulated relatively quickly. However continuum models are not always precise and have difficulty capturing certain effects such as particle size dependence. In discrete element methods (DEM), every grain and the interactions between them are simulated. DEM is accurate but solve time scales poorly with large grain numbers. Here, we present a hybrid simulation scheme, which seeks a best-of-both-worlds solution by bridging these two approaches. A mass of granular media is partitioned into three domains: a continuum domain represented using the material point method (MPM), discrete grains using DEM, and a transition zone of both MPM and DEM that are coupled via kinematic constraints. An "oracle" determines which areas of the domain are MPM and which are DEM, and converts between the two. In the canonical example of silo flow, flow with a sufficiently small orifice jams, resolving length scale dependent effects. Collapse of granular columns modeled with the hybrid method compare quantitatively well with pure discrete simulation and experiments in literature. A significant speedup is seen with the hybrid method over a similar domain of pure discrete grains.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Maytee Chantharayukhonthorn.en_US
dc.format.extent98 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.titleA hybrid discrete element and continuum method for multiscale granular media modelingen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.identifier.oclc1117714558en_US
dc.description.collectionS.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineeringen_US
dspace.imported2019-09-16T21:16:47Zen_US
mit.thesis.degreeMasteren_US
mit.thesis.departmentMechEen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record