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dc.contributor.advisorCaroline A. Ross.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCheng, Li-Chen,Ph.D.Massachusetts Institute of Technology.en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-16T21:17:35Z
dc.date.available2019-09-16T21:17:35Z
dc.date.copyright2019en_US
dc.date.issued2019en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/122156
dc.descriptionThesis: Ph. D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 2019en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.description.abstractSelf-assembly of block copolymers (BCPs) is emerging as a promising route for numerous technological applications to fabricate a variety of nanoscopic structures. The resulting feature sizes range from a few to several hundred nanometers, and are readily tunable by varying the molecular weights of block copolymers. Directed self-assembly of block copolymer is an effective way to pattern periodic arrays of features with long-range order, to generate complex patterns, and to multiplicatively increase the pattern density and resolution that are far beyond the limit of conventional lithography. Despite of the significant progress in the area of directed self-assembly in recent years, critical research problems regarding the dimension scalability toward sub-10-nm regime and large feature sizes on hundreds of nanometers scale as well as the capability of generating complex device-oriented patterns remain challenging. In this thesis, BCP systems, including high-v BCPs that are capable of self-assembling into extreme small and large feature sizes as well as those with more complex block architectures, are identified and studied in order to understand how those materials may be processed and directed selfassembly to bridge the patterning size spectrum between nano- and micro-fabrication. Another focus is placed on the scientific exploration of directed self-assembly of triblock terpolymers and the investigation on the mechanisms that regulate the scaling and geometry of self-assembled patterns. A comprehensive understanding about self-assembly of BCP thin films will enable developing device-oriented geometries, manipulating BCPs phase behavior, and incorporating new functional materials for a wider range of applications. In the meanwhile, optimizing the processing condition of self-assembly of various BCPs is essential to confirm viability of the directed self-assembly of block copolymers process in manufacturing.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Li-Chen Cheng.en_US
dc.format.extent188 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMaterials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.titleTemplated self-assembly of novel block copolymersen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and Engineeringen_US
dc.identifier.oclc1117715036en_US
dc.description.collectionPh.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineeringen_US
dspace.imported2019-09-16T21:17:32Zen_US
mit.thesis.degreeDoctoralen_US
mit.thesis.departmentMatScien_US


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