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dc.contributor.advisorJeffrey C. Grossman.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Owen P.(Owen Paul)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-16T22:34:34Z
dc.date.available2019-09-16T22:34:34Z
dc.date.copyright2019en_US
dc.date.issued2019en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/122177
dc.descriptionThesis: Ph. D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 2019en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 125-140).en_US
dc.description.abstractOptoelectronics covers a wide and varied field of devices and applications, with many requiring different material properties for operation and manufacturing. In this thesis, I describe work performed over the course of my degree to improve the performance and understanding of various optoelectronic materials. In particular, I, with the help of my collegues and collaborators, have focused on two materials with emerging applications in optoelectronic devices: lead sulphide quantum dots (PbS QDs), quantum confined materials primarily used in photovoltaics; and steam cracker tar (SCT), a petrochemical by-product that at the outset of this work was simply a waste product, with no electronic applications demonstrated. This thesis documents the progress made in five distinct projects: the development of direct nanoimprinting as a nanoscale patterning method for PbS QDs and other nanoparticles; experimental and computational work to improve our understanding of the anomalously large Stokes shift in PbS QDs; the development of a novel processing method to produce optoelectronic films from SCT and the demonstration of first applications; an in depth study of SCT as a material for windscreen de-icing, including a demonstration prototype and a technoeconomic analysis; and further optoelectronic study of SCT with the aim of evaluating its potential for use in more complex, active optoelectronics. Finally, this thesis concludes with an outlook on the future prospects of these materials and suggestions for continuing research.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Owen P. Morris.en_US
dc.format.extent140 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMaterials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.titleApplications of emerging optoelectronic materials : lead sulphide quantum dots and steam cracker taren_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and Engineeringen_US
dc.identifier.oclc1117775359en_US
dc.description.collectionPh.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineeringen_US
dspace.imported2019-09-16T22:34:31Zen_US
mit.thesis.degreeDoctoralen_US
mit.thesis.departmentMatScien_US


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