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dc.contributor.advisorJose Ignacio Pérez-Arriaga.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrusnahan, Matthew Daniel.en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Institute for Data, Systems, and Society.en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Engineering Systems Division.en_US
dc.contributor.otherTechnology and Policy Program.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-17T16:29:14Z
dc.date.available2019-09-17T16:29:14Z
dc.date.copyright2018en_US
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/122201
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M. in Technology and Policy, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Institute for Data, Systems, and Society, 2018en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 63-65).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe International Energy Agency estimates $331 billion dollars will be invested over the next 12 years to provide energy access to the 1.1 billion people who currently lack access to reliable electricity service. Of the $331 billion, the IEA estimates that 34% of this capital will be directed towards minigrid systems. In line with these capital estimates, governments in many countries with low levels of electricity service are undertaking significant capital expenditures in order to expand the existing electricity infrastructure. However, this capital is limited and will not be sufficient to provide universal access. One proposed solution to overcome limited government budgets and capacity is to allow off-grid and minigrid services in areas which will not be reached by government-led programs. This thesis utilizes a computer-based simulation model to explore how minigrid developers respond to commercial, industrial, and residential customers and the type of service these minigrid developers may choose to provide to these customers. The effect of government policies and subsidies is incorporated into the developed simulation model to judge the effect of these policies on firm behavior. The simulation results find that if governments are to prioritize universal access to rural households, specific policy measures must be put in place to encourage minigrid developers to provide service to low-income consumers.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Matthew Daniel Brusnahan.en_US
dc.format.extent72 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectInstitute for Data, Systems, and Society.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering Systems Division.en_US
dc.subjectTechnology and Policy Program.en_US
dc.titleMinigrids for electrification : policies to promote industry growthen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M. in Technology and Policyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Institute for Data, Systems, and Societyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Engineering Systems Divisionen_US
dc.contributor.departmentTechnology and Policy Programen_US
dc.identifier.oclc1110577884en_US
dc.description.collectionS.M.inTechnologyandPolicy Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Institute for Data, Systems, and Societyen_US
dspace.imported2019-09-17T16:29:12Zen_US
mit.thesis.degreeMasteren_US
mit.thesis.departmentESDen_US
mit.thesis.departmentIDSSen_US


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