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dc.contributor.advisorDonna Rhodes and George Westerman.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMihaylova, Alexandra.en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Institute for Data, Systems, and Society.en_US
dc.contributor.otherTechnology and Policy Program.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-17T16:29:48Z
dc.date.available2019-09-17T16:29:48Z
dc.date.copyright2019en_US
dc.date.issued2019en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/122209
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M. in Technology and Policy, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Institute for Data, Systems, and Society, 2019en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 93-96).en_US
dc.description.abstractAn increase in the stock of high skilled workers boosts labor productivity, though economic theory suggests some of the effect may be attenuated by skill mismatch. This research begins to identify and quantify the mechanisms through which skill mismatch affects employment outcomes. Several unique characteristics of personnel management in the US military, particularly in the Air Force, make it an attractive object of study for estimating the magnitude and range of such costs. Unlike most civilian employers, the Department of Defense directly observes the skills of incoming recruits through their achievement on the Armed Forces Qualification Test. Skill requirements for all specialties are expressed in terms of minimum qualifying scores. The matching process produces a differential between a worker's skills and the skills required by her job. Using historical Air Force recruitment and career data, it is possible to identify the relationship between skill mismatch and employment outcomes such as retention and tenure. Using a probit model specification and an instrumental variables approach, this research finds that poorly-matched workers are 20 percent less likely to be retained relative to well-matched workers. Effects of mismatch are most pronounced among high-aptitude workers. The difference in response to skill mismatch between men and women is statistically indistinguishable. These estimates offer a means to quantify the benefits an employer can expect from more thorough evaluation and better job matching of prospective workers. Technological innovations in online learning platforms and skill evaluations offer opportunities to improve matching outcomes. Strategic partnerships between online learning content providers, businesses and workers are important to make these improvements a reality.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Alexandra Mihaylova.en_US
dc.format.extent96 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectInstitute for Data, Systems, and Society.en_US
dc.subjectTechnology and Policy Program.en_US
dc.titleOccupational skill mismatch and the consequences to employment outcomesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M. in Technology and Policyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Institute for Data, Systems, and Societyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentTechnology and Policy Programen_US
dc.identifier.oclc1117709955en_US
dc.description.collectionS.M.inTechnologyandPolicy Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Institute for Data, Systems, and Societyen_US
dspace.imported2019-09-17T16:29:46Zen_US
mit.thesis.degreeMasteren_US
mit.thesis.departmentESDen_US
mit.thesis.departmentIDSSen_US


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