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dc.contributor.advisorMichael S. Triantafyllou.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGilligan, Brian Kenneth.en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-17T22:44:35Z
dc.date.available2019-09-17T22:44:35Z
dc.date.copyright2019en_US
dc.date.issued2019en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/122264
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M. in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2019en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 90-95).en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis presents a dynamic model that can be used for a digital twin of an electric ship. The model is an end-to-end simulation of a ship from prime mover to maneuvering, seakeeping, and propeller ventilation in random waves representing the behavior of a physical ship. There is a trend towards increasingly networked sensors and actuators to enable condition monitoring, ensure efficient operation, and allow for autonomy. However, a cyberattack on a networked control system presents not just the possibility of information theft but of physical system damage and loss of control. Thus, a detection scheme is proposed for cyber-physical systems using a joint unscented Kalman filter. It is employed to detect cyberattacks in the simulation model of an electric ship including sensor attacks and controller attacks on a gas turbine, synchronous generator, and automatic heading control. Finally, a system theoretic framework is presented for optimal sensor placement to minimize cyber vulnerability.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUnited States. Office of Naval Researchgrant N00014-16-1- 2956en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Brian Kenneth Gilligan.en_US
dc.format.extent95 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.titleElectric ship digital twin : framework for cyber-physical system securityen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M. in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.identifier.oclc1117714720en_US
dc.description.collectionS.M.inNavalArchitectureandMarineEngineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineeringen_US
dspace.imported2019-09-17T22:44:33Zen_US
mit.thesis.degreeMasteren_US
mit.thesis.departmentMechEen_US


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