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dc.contributor.advisorMarie Law Adams.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Sarah(Sarah Dalton)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Urban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Center for Real Estate. Program in Real Estate Development.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialn-us-caen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-19T23:17:01Z
dc.date.available2019-09-19T23:17:01Z
dc.date.copyright2019en_US
dc.date.issued2019en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/122271en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis: M.C.P., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Urban Studies and Planning, 2019en_US
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M. in Real Estate Development, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Program in Real Estate Development in conjunction with the Center for Real Estate, 2019en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 89-93).en_US
dc.description.abstractHistorically, land use planning has treated industrial land uses either antagonistically or ambivalently. Traditional zoning approaches have restricted, regulated, spatially isolated, and pushed industrial land to the periphery of cities, resulting in a significant loss of urban industrial land across American cities. But as the United States experiences a manufacturing renaissance and cities begin to recognize the value of centrally located industrial land in its contribution to the regional economy, planners are grappling with the issue of how best to secure these viable but vulnerable sites of employment and production. Advanced technologies that are changing the nature of manufacturing and logistics present an exciting opportunity and potential solution: the industrial mixed-use zone. This thesis explores the emerging land use tool of industrial-mixed use zoning, using Los Angeles as a case study.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe intent of the industrial mixed-use zone, which permits non-industrial uses, to varying degrees of intensities, in otherwise industrial districts, is to protect central locations for industrial operations when market forces might otherwise price them out. On the one hand, the zone can impede industrial business displacement through offering protection to compatible lighter industrial uses in transitioning neighborhoods. In doing so, it aims to create a live/work urban district in which several planning agendas are met and balanced, providing for industrial employment alongside affordable housing and public realm improvements. On the other hand, without strict use definitions, mix requirements or consistent regulation, the industrial mixed-use zone risks both accelerating the land use conversion process, operating as residential and commercial upzoning, and gentrifying industrial districts toward more artisanal and boutique industrial operations.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn 2019, the Los Angeles Department of City Planning will rezone industrial land in Downtown Los Angeles under a new zoning classification: hybrid-industrial. Through an exploration of Los Angeles' industrial land use policies, a process tracing of the evolution of hybrid-industrial zoning, and a dissection of the zoning ordinance's text, this thesis demonstrates the trade-offs associated with a mixed-use district and the potential challenges and pitfalls of implementation.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Sarah Brown.en_US
dc.format.extent93 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectUrban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.subjectCenter for Real Estate. Program in Real Estate Development.en_US
dc.titleHybrid-industrial zoning : a case study in Downtown Los Angelesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.C.P.en_US
dc.description.degreeS.M. in Real Estate Developmenten_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Urban Studies and Planningen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Center for Real Estate. Program in Real Estate Developmenten_US
dc.identifier.oclc1102052201en_US
dc.description.collectionM.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Urban Studies and Planningen_US
dc.description.collectionS.M.inRealEstateDevelopment Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Program in Real Estate Development in conjunction with the Center for Real Estateen_US
dspace.imported2020-03-09T19:57:41Zen_US


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