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dc.contributor.advisorDick K. P. Yue.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Cody Charles.en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-26T21:00:05Z
dc.date.available2019-09-26T21:00:05Z
dc.date.copyright2019en_US
dc.date.issued2019en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/122333
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2019en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 97-98).en_US
dc.description.abstractMuch work has been done in the development of autonomous systems for use at sea. They provide a useful way of carrying out a variety of tasks, from exploration to data collection. The vast expanse of the ocean has naturally led to interest in networks of independent, autonomous vehicles that can act in a coordinated manner, or swarm. Current swarm technology has focused on the surface of the water. However, it is desirable to be able to perform measurements at varying depths. In order to expand swarm capabilities, this work investigates using low-cost cameras and light communication to provide navigation for a subsurface sensing vehicle, by allowing it to follow a surface vehicle. This would allow for data collection at various depths, expanding the capability of the existing swarm, while maintaining the coordination of the swarm on the water's surface. This leverages the benefits of wireless communication and GPS. This work focused on developing an understanding of the potential capabilities that could be expected as a result of utilizing low-cost cameras for guidance. Testing was performed to examine tracking algorithm performance in both relatively clear testing tank water as well as turbid pond water. Using a low-cost, 5.0 Megapixel USB camera, testing showed reliable tracking performance out to a maximum range of 40 feet in clear water. Additionally, this work focused on creating an underwater platform to facilitate testing of various tracking algorithms. The platform utilizes a vertically facing USB camera, incorporated into the guidance and propulsion system of an autonomous surface vehicle. This platform allows further testing of tracking schemes as well as environmental effects, such as wave and target motion, water clarity, and ambient light.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Cody Charles White.en_US
dc.format.extent98 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.titleOptical coordination of surface and subsurface autonomous vehiclesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.identifier.oclc1119389099en_US
dc.description.collectionS.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineeringen_US
dspace.imported2019-09-26T21:00:03Zen_US
mit.thesis.degreeMasteren_US
mit.thesis.departmentMechEen_US


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