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dc.contributor.advisorPattie Maes.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKhan, Mina,S.M.Massachusetts Institute of Technology.en_US
dc.contributor.otherProgram in Media Arts and Sciences (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-12T17:42:26Z
dc.date.available2019-11-12T17:42:26Z
dc.date.copyright2018en_US
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/122896
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Planning, Program in Media Arts and Sciences, 2018en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 95-99).en_US
dc.description.abstractScience concepts lie at the heart of our everyday experiences, yet people feel disconnected from science because of the abstract way it is taught in schools. We wanted people to learn science concepts in the real world in playful ways, and used Mixed Reality (MR) to allow people to visualize and play with science concepts in the real world. We focused on Newtonian physics as our first science concept in Wonderland because Newtonian physics is commonly experienced by people in their everyday lives, especially in playful contexts, e.g., when they throw a ball. We created simple Newtonian physics tools, which served as building blocks of Newtonian physics systems to allow learners to build their own Newtonian physics models and puzzles for constructionist learning. We include different types of custom visualizations, e.g., graphs, velocity and acceleration vectors, etc, to allow the users to visualize the underlying physics of objects in scientifically accurate, yet intuitive ways. Our rewinding interface also enables users to play, pause, rewind, replay, speed up and slow down physics so that users can learn from repeated physics experimentation. We created two versions of Wonderland: a Hololens version for an immersive head-worn MR experience, and an ARKit version for a more widely accessible MR experience on iOS devices. Our experiments show that users enjoy solving Newtonian physics puzzles in Wonderland, and find the visuals and simulations helpful in understanding Newtonian physics concepts. We aim to further develop and deploy Wonderland to promote science learning and exploration in the real world.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Mina Khan.en_US
dc.format.extent99 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectProgram in Media Arts and Sciencesen_US
dc.titleWonderland : constructionist science learning in mixed realityen_US
dc.title.alternativeConstructionist science learning in mixed realityen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentProgram in Media Arts and Sciences (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)en_US
dc.identifier.oclc1126790825en_US
dc.description.collectionS.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Planning, Program in Media Arts and Sciencesen_US
dspace.imported2019-11-12T17:42:25Zen_US
mit.thesis.degreeMasteren_US
mit.thesis.departmentMediaen_US


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