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dc.contributor.advisorChintan Vaishnav.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSridhar, Rakesh.en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Institute for Data, Systems, and Society.en_US
dc.contributor.otherTechnology and Policy Program.en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-12T17:42:33Z
dc.date.available2019-11-12T17:42:33Z
dc.date.copyright2019en_US
dc.date.issued2019en_US
dc.date.issued2019en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/122898
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M. in Technology and Policy, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Institute for Data, Systems, and Society, Technology and Policy Program, 2019en_US
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M. in Transportation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2019en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 46-48).en_US
dc.description.abstractPlug-in Electric Vehicles are more efficient, have lower operating and maintenance costs, and emit fewer local air pollutants than conventional internal combustion engine vehicles. Despite these advantages, the customer adoption of plug-in electric vehicles has been slow due to their high purchase costs, limited driving range, and long recharging times. Construction of a ubiquitous network of high-power recharging stations has often been suggested as a solution to promote their adoption. Although many governments around the world are currently funding the construction of public recharging infrastructure, they cannot continue to provide support indefinitely. This necessitates a private sector-led effort to expand public recharging infrastructure for plug-in electric vehicles to become competitive with conventional vehicles.en_US
dc.description.abstractUnlike gasoline stations, public recharging infrastructure service fewer cars in a day, and hence, the traditional ancillary revenue based gasoline station business model will not be applicable. So, new, innovative business partnerships are required in the near term to support the construction of public recharging infrastructure until the demand from plug-in electric vehicles becomes significant enough to generate high revenues. Using a System Dynamics modeling approach, we modeled and simulated the electromobility eco-system comprising of electric vehicles and various types of public recharging infrastructure to determine the factors that influence the infrastructure's financial viability. We then conceptualized two business models that affect these factors to improve the cash flow and net income of public recharging infrastructure.en_US
dc.description.abstractData from literature was used to calibrate one of the two business models, and we were able to prove that public recharging infrastructure can be constructed in a profitable way if the provider partnered with a taxi fleet. Once the business model was validated, we introduced it in the electromobility eco-system simulation to estimate its impact on the adoption of Battery Electric Vehicles. With the business model in action, the public recharging infrastructure expanded by 14% from earlier and resulted in a 7% increase in the adoption of plug-in battery electric vehicles by 2050.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Rakesh Sridhar.en_US
dc.format.extent105 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectInstitute for Data, Systems, and Society.en_US
dc.subjectTechnology and Policy Program.en_US
dc.subjectCivil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.titlePotential business models for recharging infrastructure and their implications for plug-In electric vehicle adoptionen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M. in Technology and Policyen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M. in Transportationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Institute for Data, Systems, and Societyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentTechnology and Policy Programen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineeringen_US
dc.identifier.oclc1126791004en_US
dc.description.collectionS.M.inTechnologyandPolicy Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Institute for Data, Systems, and Society, Technology and Policy Programen_US
dc.description.collectionS.M.inTransportation Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineeringen_US
dspace.imported2019-11-12T17:42:32Zen_US
mit.thesis.degreeMasteren_US
mit.thesis.departmentTPPen_US
mit.thesis.departmentESDen_US
mit.thesis.departmentIDSSen_US
mit.thesis.departmentCivEngen_US


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