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dc.contributor.advisorRafi Segal.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNazmeeva, Alina.en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-23T16:59:04Z
dc.date.available2020-01-23T16:59:04Z
dc.date.copyright2019en_US
dc.date.issued2019en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/123596en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M. in Architecture Studies (Urbanism), Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Architecture, 2019en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 91-97).en_US
dc.description.abstractNew technologies always produce new toys, and the toys become commodities that gain profit. The most pervasive and profitable technological toys of the contemporary world, videogames and virtual worlds, have become social and cultural spaces for hundreds of millions of humans, while immediate urban space- an offline space-- is losing its value as a dominant center and source of meaning, identity and ideology. As the virtual is an inevitable product, transmitter, and constructor of contemporary culture, how it is designed becomes a critical question. Rule-of-thumb neoliberal logic grounds almost every online virtual graphic environment: the logic of exquisite self-craft and appropriation of space: a promise of total control over self and over what is one's own. It is manifested through uniquely designed avatar skins and clothes; virtual pets and gardening tools; real estate speculation, urban development and terraforming patterns. Yet there is a mismatch between the logic and the purpose of these virtual environments, which is a collective, and the presence among others, unencumbered with immediate contexts and limitations. This thesis theorizes on self-craft and space-craft protocols and their manifestations found in the virtual world Second Life, where every single artifact of the space is produced by its residents. A child of the Silicon Valley techno-utopianism, Second Life is an expressive space with no collective history, decay or memory: Manhattan towers, medieval castles and gingerbread houses generate a landscape of expressive hysteria. It is also a call to reimagine the rhetoric of the virtual social space and an experiment that seeks to identify alternative set of social and algorithmic protocols that enable different possibilities of self- and space-craft. Utilizing the affordances of the malleable virtual context, the experiment seeks to discover alternative narratives for the social space.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Alina Nazmeeva.en_US
dc.format.extent97 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
dc.titleConstructing the virtual as a social formen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M. in Architecture Studies (Urbanism)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architectureen_US
dc.identifier.oclc1135863643en_US
dc.description.collectionS.M.inArchitectureStudies(Urbanism) Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Architectureen_US
dspace.imported2020-03-09T19:58:58Zen_US


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