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dc.contributor.advisorJohn Kennedy.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDougherty, Jeffrey,S.M.Massachusetts Institute of Technology.en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Center for Real Estate. Program in Real Estate Development.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-23T17:00:09Z
dc.date.available2020-01-23T17:00:09Z
dc.date.copyright2019en_US
dc.date.issued2019en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/123613en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M. in Real Estate Development, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Program in Real Estate Development in conjunction with the Center for Real Estate, 2019en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 54-60).en_US
dc.description.abstractDigital-native retail brands have business models that sit at the intersection of two major narratives in retail: technology and brick-and-mortar stores. Founded online, they rely on technology to attract a Millennial customer base that gets most of their brand information over the internet. Digital-native retailers are also opening, not closing, brick-and-mortar stores at an accelerating pace. Recent studies have suggested that digital-native retail brands will grow from roughly 600 to over 1,400 brick-and-mortar locations in the coming years. However, these projections only consider existing brands, and industry trends suggest that the actual number of physical stores opened by digital-native retail brands will be significantly greater. Real estate owners that develop leasing strategies focused on the specialized needs of digital-native retail brands are positioned to benefit.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe brick-and-mortar store locations of digital-native retail brands provide key insights into their site selection criteria and brand strategies. Store locations are based on customer data from their online stores. As a result, the sites brands select indicate locations with strong target consumer demand. To analyze trends, we identified 58 major digital-native retail brands that have opened a permanent physical store location in the United States. Then, we collected the addresses of the 608 individual stores that they operate. Among other insights, the store location results indicate that digital-native brands concentrate in New York, Los Angeles, and San Francisco before moving into other major metro areas. Within each metro area, digital-native brands agglomerate into both shopping centers and retail streets located within high-income neighborhoods.en_US
dc.description.abstractRetail property owners have an opportunity to leverage their expertise in physical retail to assist digital-native retail brands in successfully establishing themselves offline. A brand's first few brick-and-mortar locations are a high-stakes bet that falls outside of the company's core competency. Beyond leasing the physical space, landlords can offer support in identifying store locations, completing tenant improvements, and assisting in the store permitting process. Real estate owners and investors that provide low-capital, turnkey spaces and a streamlined leasing process will be attractive to a growing number of digital-native retail brands.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Jeffrey Dougherty.en_US
dc.format.extent60 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectCenter for Real Estate. Program in Real Estate Development.en_US
dc.titleFrom clicks to bricks : the impact of digital-native consumer brands on retail real estateen_US
dc.title.alternativeImpact of digital-native consumer brands on retail real estateen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M. in Real Estate Developmenten_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Center for Real Estate. Program in Real Estate Developmenten_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Center for Real Estate
dc.identifier.oclc1135874460en_US
dc.description.collectionS.M.inRealEstateDevelopment Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Program in Real Estate Development in conjunction with the Center for Real Estateen_US
dspace.imported2020-03-09T19:59:38Zen_US


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