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dc.contributor.advisorMarcia Bartusiak.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPontecorvo, Emily.en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Comparative Media Studies.en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Graduate Program in Science Writing.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-10T22:51:42Z
dc.date.available2020-02-10T22:51:42Z
dc.date.copyright2019en_US
dc.date.issued2019en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/123785
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M. in Science Writing, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Comparative Media Studies/Writing, 2019en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 20-21).en_US
dc.description.abstractIn 2009, when Apple released the iPhone 3GS, it was the first accessible touchscreen smartphone. This centralized platform, with its built-in GPS, high quality camera, powerful processor, and continuous connectivity, paved the way for new approaches to making a whole range of activities more accessible and convenient for the blind and visually impaired. Where once a blind person might have filled an entire shopping cart with expensive devices that had very specific functions, they could now get nearly all of those services in one device. But even as the iPhone pushed accessibility forward, every door it opened led to another one bolted shut. A blind smartphone user can access mobile apps and social media platforms, but when those applications are not designed to be interpreted by Voiceover, they hit a brick wall. Full accessibility is still either entirely absent from apps, websites, and new devices, or it is thoroughly misguided. The iPhone blurred the line between assistive technology and mainstream technology. It raised the bar for digital accessibility, adding fuel to the fire of the blind community's movement for inclusive design.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Emily Pontecorvo.en_US
dc.format.extent21 pages ;en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectComparative Media Studies.en_US
dc.subjectGraduate Program in Science Writing.en_US
dc.titleNavigating the 21st Century without vision : how the iPhone changed the landscape for assistive technology and fueled the movement fighting for digital accessibilityen_US
dc.title.alternativeHow the iPhone changed the landscape for assistive technology and fueled the movement fighting for digital accessibilityen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M. in Science Writingen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Comparative Media Studiesen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Graduate Program in Science Writingen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Graduate Program in Science Writing
dc.identifier.oclc1139316614en_US
dc.description.collectionS.M.inScienceWriting Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Comparative Media Studies/Writingen_US
dspace.imported2020-02-10T22:51:42Zen_US
mit.thesis.degreeMasteren_US
mit.thesis.departmentCMSWen_US


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