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dc.contributor.advisorCeasar McDowell.en_US
dc.contributor.authorXu, Daphne Y.en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Urban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-28T20:50:53Z
dc.date.available2020-02-28T20:50:53Z
dc.date.copyright2019en_US
dc.date.issued2019en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/123915
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis: M.C.P., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Urban Studies and Planning, 2019en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student-submitted PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 54-56).en_US
dc.description.abstractChinese Speed is an exploration of the affective dimensions of top-down modernist planning in the context of contemporary China. It is an investigation into lived experiences of state-funded mega-projects and the cultural impacts of infrastructure. Specifically, I look into the high-speed rail (HSR) as the literal and symbolic connecting feature of the Jing-Jin-Ji megaregion proposed in the 2035 Beijing Master Plan. I study the high-speed rail (HSR) in China utilizing ethnographic methods in the train, in HSR stations, and in place-based communities on sites around new and proposed HSR stations. I am interested in the meaning of the HSR as a cultural artifact, a semiotic and aesthetic vehicle towards China's current national project. I am also interested in the changing sense of place and time in rural villages and towns along new and proposed HSR stations within the context of rapid development. This media thesis consists of a collection of multimedia works including a photo book, video installations, and a short film. They are experiments in creating nonlinear narratives surrounding the HSR in varied forms, and translating research findings into accessible modes of engagement. Documentation of completed visual work is contained in a website within Beijing22 (www.beijing22.org), a curatorial project funded by the Goethe Institute that sets out to be a "living archive" of Beijing's urban development before the 2022 Winter Olympics. This media thesis stems out of a larger multi-year project initiated in January 2018 called The Harmonious Commute by the Sponge Gourd Collective, consisting of Beatrix Chu, Daphne Xu, and Diane Zhou.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Daphne Y. Xu.en_US
dc.format.extent56 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectUrban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.titleChinese Speeden_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.C.P.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Urban Studies and Planningen_US
dc.identifier.oclc1139722969en_US
dc.description.collectionM.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Urban Studies and Planningen_US
dspace.imported2020-02-28T20:50:52Zen_US
mit.thesis.degreeMasteren_US
mit.thesis.departmentUrbStuden_US


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