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dc.contributor.advisorDayna Cunningham.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGilman, Scott T.(Scott Thompson)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Urban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-28T20:52:39Z
dc.date.available2020-02-28T20:52:39Z
dc.date.issued2019en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/123956
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis: M.C.P., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Urban Studies and Planning, 2019en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student-submitted PDF version of thesis. "June 2019."en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 83-88).en_US
dc.description.abstractIn the past decade, planners and cities have made increasing use of engagement games as a form of participatory planning and policymaking. Games are often presented as a remedy for the shortcomings of traditional participatory processes. This thesis seeks to investigate those assumptions by situating engagement games in the theory of participatory planning. First, it reviews the literature on participatory planning to elucidate the primary goals and problems of participatory processes and to create a framework to evaluate engagement games. Then, a review of previous games used in planning reveals engagement games' relative strengths. Next, the thesis considers two case studies of engagement games used for participatory planning: the Big Easy Budget Game in New Orleans, LA, and the San Jose Budget Games in San Jose, CA. A comparison of these two case studies using the framework reveals that they both significantly contribute to situated learning. Other outcomes such as social learning, political efficacy, and involvement of marginalized groups depend on the design of the game as well as the design of the larger participatory forum in which it is played. The thesis hopes to offer planners, cities, and advocacy groups interested in using games to improve participatory processes a practical overview of the value of engagement games and the features which enable them to contribute to the goals of participatory processes.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Scott T. Gilman.en_US
dc.format.extent91 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectUrban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.titlePlaying with planning : evaluating games as a method of participatory planning and policymakingen_US
dc.title.alternativeEvaluating games as a method of participatory planning and policymakingen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.C.P.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Urban Studies and Planningen_US
dc.identifier.oclc1140445987en_US
dc.description.collectionM.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Urban Studies and Planningen_US
dspace.imported2020-02-28T20:52:38Zen_US
mit.thesis.degreeMasteren_US
mit.thesis.departmentUrbStuden_US


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