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dc.contributor.authorBinzel, Richard P
dc.contributor.authorEarle, Alissa M.
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-06T19:43:54Z
dc.date.available2020-04-06T19:43:54Z
dc.date.issued2018-11
dc.date.submitted2017-08
dc.identifier.issn0019-1035
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/124498
dc.description.abstractPluto's atmospheric haze settles out rapidly compared with geological timescales. It needs to be accounted for as a surface material, distinct from Pluto's icy bedrock and from the volatile ices that migrate via sublimation and condensation on seasonal timescales. This paper explores how a steady supply of atmospheric haze might affect three distinct provinces on Pluto. We pose the question of why they each look so different from one another if the same haze material is settling out onto all of them. Cthulhu is a more ancient region with comparatively little present-day geological activity, where the haze appears to simply accumulate over time. Sputnik Planitia is a very active region where glacial convection, as well as sublimation and condensation rapidly refresh the surface, hiding recently deposited haze from view. Lowell Regio is a region of intermediate age featuring very distinct coloration from the rest of Pluto. Using a simple model haze particle as a colorant, we are not able to match the colors in both Lowell Regio and Cthulhu. To account for their distinct colors, we propose that after arrival at Pluto's surface, haze particles may be less inert than might be supposed from the low surface temperatures. They must either interact with local materials and environments to produce distinct products in different regions, or else the supply of haze must be non-uniform in time and/or location, such that different products are delivered to different places. ©2018 keywords: Pluto; Pluto, surface; Pluto, atmosphere; Geological processes; Ices; Photochemistryen_US
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevier BVen_US
dc.relation.isversionof10.1016/J.ICARUS.2018.05.019en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs Licenseen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.sourcearXiven_US
dc.titlePluto's haze as a surface materialen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.citationGrundy, W. M., et al., "Pluto's haze as a surface material." Icarus 314 (2018): p. 232-45 doi 10.1016/J.ICARUS.2018.05.019 ©2018 Author(s)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciencesen_US
dc.relation.journalIcarusen_US
dc.eprint.versionAuthor's final manuscripten_US
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticleen_US
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerRevieweden_US
dc.date.updated2020-04-03T16:40:52Z
dspace.orderedauthorsW.M. Grundy; T. Bertrand; R.P. Binzel; M.W. Buie; B.J. Buratti; A.F. Cheng; J.C. Cook; D.P. Cruikshank; S.L. Devins; C.M. Dalle Ore; A.M. Earle; K. Ennico; F. Forget; P. Gao; G.R. Gladstone; C.J.A. Howett; D.E. Jennings; J.A. Kammer; T.R. Lauer; I.R. Linscott; C.M. Lisse; A.W. Lunsford; W.B. McKinnon; C.B. Olkin; A.H. Parker; S. Protopapa; E. Quirico; D.C. Reuter; B. Schmitt; K.N. Singer; J.A. Spencer; S.A. Stern; D.F. Strobel; M.E. Summers; H.A. Weaver; G.E. Weigle II; M.L. Wong; E.F. Young; L.A. Youngen_US
dspace.date.submission2020-04-03T16:40:56Z
mit.journal.volume314en_US
mit.licensePUBLISHER_CC


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