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dc.contributor.authorFeldman, Andrew F
dc.contributor.authorGianotti, Daniel J
dc.contributor.authorTrigo, Isabel F.
dc.contributor.authorSalvucci, Guido D.
dc.contributor.authorEntekhabi, Dara
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-05T20:47:48Z
dc.date.available2020-06-05T20:47:48Z
dc.date.issued2019-12
dc.date.submitted2019-06
dc.identifier.issn1944-7973
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/125701
dc.description.abstractLand surface energetic partitioning between latent, sensible, and ground heat fluxes determines climate and influences the terrestrial segment of land-atmosphere coupling. Soil moisture, among other variables, has a direct influence on this partitioning. Dry surfaces characterize a water-limited regime where evapotranspiration and soil moisture are coupled. This coupling is subdued for wet surfaces, or an energy-limited regime. This framework is commonly evaluated using the evaporative fraction–-soil moisture relationship. However, this relationship is explicitly or implicitly prescribed in land surface models. These impositions, in turn, confound model-based evaluations of energetic partitioning-–soil moisture relationships. In this study, we use satellite-based observations of surface temperature diurnal amplitude (directly related to available energy partitioning) and soil moisture, free of model impositions, to estimate characteristics of surface energetic partitioning–-soil moisture relationships during 10–-20-day surface drying periods across Africa. We specifically estimate the spatial patterns of water-limited energy flux sensitivity to soil moisture (m) and the soil moisture threshold separating water and energy-limited regimes (θ*). We also assess how time evolution of other factors (e.g., solar radiation, vapor pressure deficit, surface albedo, and wind speed) can confound the energetic partitioning–-soil moisture relationship. We find higher m in drier regions and interestingly similar spatial θ* distributions across biomes. Vapor pressure deficit and insolation increases during drying tend to increase m. Only vapor pressure deficit increases in the Sahelian grasslands systematically decrease θ*. Ultimately, soil and atmospheric moisture availability together play the largest role in land surface energy partitioning with minimal consistent influences of time evolution of other forcings. ©2019. The Authors.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNASA sponsored research grant (Subcontract No.1510842).en_US
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherAmerican Geophysical Union (AGU)en_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2019WR025874en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 International licenseen_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.sourceAmerican Geophysical Union (AGU)en_US
dc.titleSatellite‐Based Assessment of Land Surface Energy Partitioning–Soil Moisture Relationships and Effects of Confounding Variablesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.citationFeldman, Andrew F. et al., "Satellite‐Based Assessment of Land Surface Energy Partitioning–Soil Moisture Relationships and Effects of Confounding Variables." Water Resources Research 55, 12 (December 2019): 10657-77 doi. 10.1029/2019WR025874 ©2019 Authorsen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineeringen_US
dc.relation.journalWater Resources Researchen_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticleen_US
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerRevieweden_US
dc.date.updated2020-05-26T19:08:13Z
dspace.date.submission2020-05-26T19:08:18Z
mit.journal.volume55en_US
mit.journal.issue12en_US
mit.licensePUBLISHER_CC
mit.metadata.statusComplete


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