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dc.contributor.advisorDavid E. Hardt and Roy E. Welsch.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGaudio, Brian Gabriel.en_US
dc.contributor.otherSloan School of Management.en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.contributor.otherLeaders for Global Operations Program.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-03T15:51:29Z
dc.date.available2020-09-03T15:51:29Z
dc.date.issued2020en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/126899
dc.descriptionThesis: M.B.A., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Sloan School of Management, in conjunction with the Leaders for Global Operations Program at MIT, May, 2020en_US
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, in conjunction with the Leaders for Global Operations Program at MIT, May, 2020en_US
dc.description"May 2020." Cataloged from the official PDF of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 110-115).en_US
dc.description.abstractOver the past one hundred years, maintenance concepts have evolved from a simple "fix when broken" approach to advanced prognostic methods used today that leverage large amounts of historical, operational, and primary sensor data to predict when and how failures will occur. For firms that produce complex assets, the ability to predict with accuracy when maintenance overhauls should occur can provide both an operational and economic competitive advantage. This research evaluates the hypothesis that the accuracy of predictive maintenance models for complex assets can be improved with the addition of historical operational data and failure modes can be more clearly identified by examining primary sensor data. This hypothesis is tested through data analysis on predictive maintenance models used by commercial turbofan jet engines. Because some engines have operated for decades, their entire operational records are not in the appropriate digital format and not utilized by current models. This research identifies alternate, available sources of this data. The additional data sources were processed and incorporated into the existing predictive maintenance models. The addition of the operational data sources did not reduce the error in the model used to forecast the useful life of assets for preventative maintenance, which suggests that the current coverage provided by existing data is sufficient. The examination of primary sensor data isolated one component that displayed age-related degradation and maintenance costs.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Brian Gabriel Gaudio.en_US
dc.format.extent128 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses may be protected by copyright. Please reuse MIT thesis content according to the MIT Libraries Permissions Policy, which is available through the URL provided.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectSloan School of Management.en_US
dc.subjectMechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.subjectLeaders for Global Operations Program.en_US
dc.titleAssessing the impact of historical operational data from complex assets on predictive maintenance modelsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.B.A.en_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentSloan School of Managementen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.departmentLeaders for Global Operations Programen_US
dc.identifier.oclc1191622989en_US
dc.description.collectionM.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Sloan School of Managementen_US
dc.description.collectionS.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineeringen_US
dspace.imported2020-09-03T15:51:29Zen_US
mit.thesis.degreeMasteren_US
mit.thesis.departmentSloanen_US
mit.thesis.departmentMechEen_US


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