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dc.contributor.advisorCaroline A. Jones.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDavidow, Jackson(Jackson Struthers),1990-en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-18T21:30:46Z
dc.date.available2020-10-18T21:30:46Z
dc.date.copyright2019en_US
dc.date.issued2019en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/128063
dc.descriptionThesis: Ph. D. in History and Theory of Art, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Architecture, May, 2019en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis. Images from pages 324 to 374 are redacted.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 295-323).en_US
dc.description.abstractMost histories of HIV/AIDS, art, and cultural activism pivot around New York and are confined to the American context. Instead, this dissertation maps out a more expansive transnational Anglophone network of individuals, projects, and coalitions that conceived of the virus as a global problem during the 1980s and 1990s. Methodologically combining archival research with oral history interviews, this study proposes and models an epidemiological approach to art history that tracks and theorizes significant patterns of viral propagation, activist response, and visual culture-making across groups in Canada, the United Kingdom, South Africa, and the United States. Each chapter focuses on artists, activists, and critics--many of whom were queer, women, and people of color--as they formed communities in which the virus generated local, national, and global discourses and practices of cultural activism. Structured around four historical case-studies in and across Toronto, London, Cape Town, Johannesburg, and Boston, this dissertation encompasses a diverse cultural archive cutting across media and aesthetic forms: visual artworks, films, exhibitions, texts, protests, workshops, campaigns, festivals, and nightlife. Ultimately, this dissertation argues that transnational AIDS cultural activism, with its viral aesthetic strategies, emergent modes of identification, and bold political interventions in public space, produced new critical understandings of postmodernism, queerness, globalization, and postcoloniality.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Jackson Davidow.en_US
dc.format.extent374 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses may be protected by copyright. Please reuse MIT thesis content according to the MIT Libraries Permissions Policy, which is available through the URL provided.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
dc.titleViral visions : art, activism, and epidemiology in the global AIDS pandemicen_US
dc.title.alternativeArt, activism, and epidemiology in the global AIDS pandemicen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D. in History and Theory of Arten_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architectureen_US
dc.identifier.oclc1199073116en_US
dc.description.collectionPh.D.inHistoryandTheoryofArt Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Architectureen_US
dspace.imported2020-10-18T21:30:35Zen_US
mit.thesis.degreeDoctoralen_US
mit.thesis.departmentArchen_US


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